In The Loop

News and views from across Mayo Clinic

December 18th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Artsy Chartsy – Making Space for Art

By In the Loop

Read time: 2 minutes
Man standing in art gallery with blank canvases on the wallsWhile we may all appreciate art in its various forms, we may not always have easy access to it. This can be especially true for residents of a retirement or assisted-living home, such as Mayo Clinic’s Charter House. With that in mind, the good folks at Charter House came up with an idea to open up space to make art accessible for its residents and the community at large, and to give local artists another place to show their work.

Enter the Parkside Gallery Art Exhibit. Once each quarter, a space on the main floor of Charter House will be transformed to create a true art-gallery vibe. And local artists will show of their work, interact with the crowd and, we assume, make an impression. The first show is Thursday, Jan. 8, from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. and will feature artists Philip Taylor and Bobby Marines. It’s free and open to all.

Taylor is a Rochester-based artist and Mayo Clinic employee who describes his art as “abstract paintings for the creative intellect.” In his artist’s statement, Taylor says, “Chance, spontaneity, lyrical and rebellious are qualities in my work.” And he says for him, the process of making art is “emotionally charged and spiritual.” Marines says his “diversity in medium and subject matter vary as much as his interpretation of life does.” In an interview on Local Artist Interviews, he says he started out using discarded canvases and household paints to make “horrible stuff that nobody wanted to see.” He’s come a long way since then and now boasts clients such as Starbucks, the Rochester Youth Commission, Rochester Art Center, and our very own Destination Medical Center. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Tags: Charter House

December 18th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Taking ‘Chap’s Challenge’

By In the Loop

Read time: 2 minutes
Pile of childrens' books.As Kathy Chapiewsky prepared to ride off into the sunset and begin her retirement after 45 years with Mayo Clinic Health System – Franciscan Healthcare in La Crosse, Wisconsin, she found herself in tears even before her retirement party got started. Some of those tears, of course, were for the friends, co-workers and colleagues she was leaving behind. And then there was the giant stack of books sitting on a table nearby.

“I walked into my retirement party, and they had all of the books piled up,” Kathy tells us. “It was fantastic.” As is the story behind those stacks of books.

The books were a way for Kathy to do one more thing for young patients and visitors at the Family Health Clinic before she started a new chapter in her life. Kathy tells us that she enjoyed working with the “Reach Out and Read Program” at the medical center. But she had begun to notice that some young readers-in-training were missing out. “The (Franciscan Healthcare) Auxiliary buys books to give to young patients and visitors at the hospital,” she says. “The books are geared toward kids ages 1 to 5, and those for the 5-year-olds were going faster than the others.” Kathy tells the LaCrosse Tribune that meant some older kids weren’t getting books at their well-child visits. “And they don’t like that,” she says. And neither did she.  [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Tags: Franciscan Healthcare, La Crosse, Mayo Clinic Health System

December 18th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Quote of the day

By In the Loop

“Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.”

Pablo Picasso

December 16th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Deck the Halls ... and Lobbies

By In the Loop

Read time: 2 minutes, 30 seconds
The Sister of Saint Francis gather around the Christmas tree at Saint Marys Hospital in a archive photo.It’s beginning to look at lot like the holiday season is upon us. Once again, the Plummer Building in Rochester has that Christmas tree sort of glow, the continuation of a holiday tradition. There are Love Lights at Mayo Clinic Health System sites in Northwest Wisconsin, as community members remember their loved ones and raise funds for hospice programs. Other locations, work units and departments throughout the organization are getting festive, too (within the applicable guidelines, we assume). There’s even a little bit of Mayo on the Capitol Christmas Tree this year.

And, in a more recent holiday tradition, the Sisters of Saint Francis have again dipped into the archives to share a holiday memory with us. Sister Lauren Weinandt, keeper of the archives on the Saint Marys campus, sent us a page from our history penned by Sister Theodora Mikolai looking back on some festive flourishes that trace back to 1900, just over a decade after the hospital’s opening. Sister Theodora, one of the original Sisters at Saint Marys, decided that a Christmas tree placed in the hospital lobby lacked a certain flair. We’ll let her tell the rest of the story.  [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Tags: history, Holidays, Saint Marys Hospital, Sisters of Saint Francis

December 16th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Ready for Tip-off

By In the Loop

Read time: 2 minutes
Basketball players battle for a rebound.Sports provide a fertile field for comeback stories. And one recently told by Bismarck Tribune, is worth celebrating on the court and in the surgical suite. The Tribune profiles Bismarck's Century High School varsity basketball player Luke Leingang, who returned to the court this year after being treated for a tumor at Mayo Clinic back in 2012.

It all started with neck pain and “tingling” sensation in the arm that the family tells the newspaper they thought might have been caused by a “pinched nerve or bunched disk.” But after a trip to the doctor and an MRI, it became clear that more was going on. “The tumor was an osteoblastoma, which means that it was a bone tumor,” Luke tells the Tribune. “When they found (the tumor), it had already eaten away at most of my C5 vertebra.”  [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Tags: cancer, Osteoblastoma, Pediatric Neurology

December 16th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Quote of the Day

By In the Loop

“Nothing says holidays, like a cheese log.”

Ellen DeGeneres

December 11th, 2014 · 2 Comments

A Priceless Gift to Parents Who Lose a Baby

By In the Loop

Read time: 2 minutes
Image of a photographer taking a photo. They say a photo is worth a thousand words. Jan Favret knows it can be worth much more. A cardiology nurse at Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, Favret is also a professional photographer and a volunteer with Now I Lay Me Down To Sleep. The nonprofit organization provides remembrance photography at no charge to families who have lost a baby, often to stillbirth. What that can mean for the family is hard to put into words.

“For most of the families we photograph, parents go into labor with no idea this is going to happen,” says Favret. “The nursery is ready at home, and they are completely unprepared for this loss. They’re caught by horrible surprise. They have to say goodbye before they’ve had a chance to say hello.”

In the midst of their “profound grief,” families are asked by hospital staff if they’d like to have portraits taken of their child and family. If the answer is yes, a specially trained volunteer like Favret is called to the hospital, often just hours after the baby’s birth. “There’s a quiet grief in the room, a stillness,” says Favret. “The family is trying to process what has happened.” Often, they’re uncertain of what to do. Do they touch their child? Hold her? Dress him in the outfit they’d planned to take him home in?

Favret says having photos taken seems to help answer some of those questions. “It’s almost like it gives the families permission to treat their baby as they would a living infant. It gives them permission to hold that baby in their arms,” she says. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Tags: Eau Claire, Mayo Clinic Health System

December 11th, 2014 · 2 Comments

‘I Am a Mayo Success Story’ – But Not in the Way You’re Thinking

By In the Loop

Read time: 3 minutes, 30 seconds
Image of woman's hands typing on computer keyboard. Last week, Erin Konkle, a Mayo patient wrote us to talk about the “success stories” we share in these pages. Her note was not what we expected. It was much, much more. There’s not a lot we can add, so we’ll let her words do the talking. (With her permission, of course.)

I spend a lot of time at the Mayo Clinic. When I moved to Minneapolis four years ago, I did not know the Mayo name, and I could not have placed Rochester on a map. I was an always-healthy 28-year-old with no real need to think about my health beyond fruits, veggies and a daily run. That changed quickly. I started at a health care system in the Cities, and after four biopsies in as many weeks, three independent doctors told me in kind tones that they could not help. A friend told me that Rochester was an hour away and that I needed to go to Mayo.

I did my homework. As a millennial and a researcher, I Google everything before I show up. I knew what I was getting myself into. Reading the stories set a clear expectation and path to success. Mayo would know what was wrong and fix it. I could soon go back to my life of blissful ignorance of the medical world.

Fast forward to a waiting room on Gonda 2 South two and half years later. All around me, people are being poked, scanned, consoled and congratulated, but I’m still just right here in the waiting room ... still waiting.  [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Load More