In The Loop

News and views from across Mayo Clinic

August 26th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

'A beautiful event' of caring

By In the Loop

Sullivans760

Bryant Sullivan, BMT Nurse Michel Benz and Joanne Sullivan

In February, we brought you the story of Joanne and Bryant Sullivan, the mother and son from Barrington, Illinois, who found themselves in the middle of a medical emergency nobody should ever find themselves in.

Back in 2012, Joanne needed, and ultimately received, a bone marrow transplant from an anonymous donor. Soon after her transplant at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Bryant and his two brothers volunteered to be tested and added to the National Marrow Donor Registry. And just one year later, on his mother's birthday no less, Bryant got the call that he was a match. He was able to donate stem cells to someone in need on Nov. 12, 2013, just as his mother’s donor had done. Their positive experience and story helped to recruit new donors at last weekend's bone marrow registration drive. The event, held at Chicago's Navy Pier was put on by the national donor program and Mayo Clinic.

"It was basically like a no-brainer for me," Bryant recently told the Chicago Tribune of his decision to join the registry. "I was thrilled to be given the chance to help, to give back." [...]

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Tags: bone marrow transplant, Dr Mrinal Patnaik

August 26th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

A Surgical Decathlon

By In the Loop

SurgicalGames760Think of the word "Olympics" and, more often than not, your minds conjure up images of elite athletes competing in their sports of choice. At Mayo Clinic, however, there's a different style of Olympics staged twice a year and the competitors are our very own first-year surgical residents.

As reported in Mayo Clinic's Shields magazine, Mayo surgical residents participate in the Summer Surgical Olympics within the first month of their residency program. Similar to a decathlon, these Olympics also have 10 events and each resident gets just 15 minutes to complete each one. The events range from routine (for the residents, not the rest of us) laparoscopic surgery procedures to more complex challenges, such as reacting to a trauma event. Felt and other materials from retail stores are used to simulate body parts. According to David Farley, M.D., Surgery, these materials are inexpensive (costing less than $50 per session), are reusable, and have no foul odors. [...]

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Tags: Dr David Farley, Edwin Onkendi, Resident

August 26th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Quote of the Day

By In the Loop

"Kindness in words creates confidence. Kindness in thinking creates profoundness. Kindness in giving creates love."

Lao Tzu

August 21st, 2014 · 2 Comments

Cooling Down for a Cause

By In the Loop

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMq_Yrn2YYkThere are lots of folks in lots of places doing the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge -- some successfully and some not so much -- and all that ice water is getting an incredible amount of attention and extraordinary funding for ALS research. Few of the resulting videos, however, are as compelling as those by ALS patients, themselves, and their family members doing the challenge for the greater ALS family. And we'd add, ALS researchers going beyond simply pouring their souls into their work to put their body temperatures, pocketbooks and, perhaps, their dignity on the line for ALS research.

Last week, two such groups, the ALS research team in Florida and Drs. Eric Sorenson and Nathan Staff in Rochester took part in the Ice Bucket Challenge. Leonard Petrucelli, Ph.D., who introduced the research team in Florida in their video, not only got a double-dose of ice water, but then also got pelted with water balloons by his (apparently very secure in their jobs) research team. And he couldn't have been a better sport about it.

Rosa Rademakers, Ph.D., who also got soaked with the team in Florida, says she wasn't aware of the initiative until the team was challenged. "It felt like the right thing to do and a small sacrifice for us to raise awareness of ALS," she says. [...]

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Tags: ALS, Dr Eric Sorenson, Dr Leonard Petrucelli, Dr Nathan Staff, Dr Rosa Rademakers, research

August 21st, 2014 · Leave a Comment

The Rhinestone Cowboy and Mayo Clinic

By In the Loop

Glen Campbell and Ronald Petersen, M.D., in the movie "Glen Campbell: I'l Be Me."

A scene from the documentary "Glen Campbell: I'll Be Me," due out this fall.

For more than five decades, Glen Campbell has been making our ears happy with songs from his more than 70 studio albums. But back in 2011, an Alzheimer's disease diagnosis threatened to put that to an end. Rather than riding off into the sunset, however, Campbell decided to give the world an inside look at his battle with the disease through a new documentary due out this fall called, "Glen Campbell: I'll Be Me," according to Entertainment Tonight. And he invited Mayo's Ron Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., along for the ride. (Dr. Petersen even made the movie trailer.)

"The producers asked if Mayo would like to be involved by lending some medical expertise to the film to help explain what Alzheimer's is all about," Dr. Petersen tells us. "I, of course, said yes." From there, Dr. Petersen says he began having discussions with the film's producers, and Campbell himself, to hammer out what his involvement in the documentary would look like. [...]

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Tags: Alzheimer's disease, Dr Ronald Petersen, research

August 21st, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Quote of the Day

By In the Loop

"I'm gonna be where the lights are shining on me. Like a rhinestone cowboy."

Glen Campbell

August 19th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Running for life

By In the Loop

Linda Wortman was inspired to run to raise lung cancer awareness.

Linda Wortman shares her lung cancer survivor story with Team Draft

For nearly two years, Linda Wortman thought she had SARS. Or TB. Or something along those lines. "I had a cough that wouldn't go away," the former Northwest Airlines flight attendant tells us. "I'd start choking. I thought I was going to die." Despite appointment after appointment for symptoms that wouldn't go away, Linda says her doctors back home in Montana brushed off her requests for a chest X-ray. It wasn't until she came to Mayo Clinic that she received a diagnosis she says she never saw coming: lung cancer.

"You could have knocked me over with a feather," she says. "I've never smoked in my life. I cross country ski. I eat right. But that explained the cough." Two days after her diagnosis, Linda -- who was one of several flight attendants who helped get smoking banned on airlines back in the 1970s -- was in an operating room at Mayo Clinic having a three-centimeter tumor removed from one of her lungs.

After the surgery, Linda says she became determined to show the world she could "live a normal life again," so she started running. During a trip to Mississippi, running to "stay in shape" turned into much more. [...]

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Tags: Lung Cancer, Running, Wellness

August 19th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Take the Mayo Clinic Heritage Quiz

By In the Loop

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You've probably noticed a certain fundraising movement happening right now that involves individuals dumping buckets of ice water on themselves or making a donation for ALS research (or, preferably, both). It’s been pretty successful. But what if we told you about a way you could help fund Mayo Clinic Research and stay perfectly dry? All you'd have to do is take a five-question quiz.

Our friends in Development are challenging folks to challenge ourselves by taking the Mayo Mystery History Quiz, in honor of Mayo's 150th anniversary. Regardless of how well you do, just taking the quiz benefits Mayo Clinic research, thanks to the generosity of a grateful Mayo patient. For every person who finishes this five-question challenge — no matter what your score — this benefactor has offered to donate $1 to fund research into new treatments and cures for diseases like cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, up to $5,000.

If you’re a Mayo Clinic employee who's been around for a while (and paid attention), the quiz shouldn't be too difficult. (And a bad grade won't go on your permanent record.) [...]

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Tags: Development, Sesquicentennial

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