In The Loop

News and views from across Mayo Clinic

July 22nd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

What the Patient Care Fund is all about

By In the Loop

Apache Mall presents a check for the Mayo Clinic Sesquicentennial Patient Care Fund. Pictured above, Kerry Olsen, M.D.; Kim Bradley, Apache Mall; Cynthia Suhr; Jane and John Collins (Cynthia’s parents); and Carole Stiles, Medical Social Services.

Apache Mall presents a check for the Mayo Clinic Sesquicentennial Patient Care Fund. Pictured above, Kerry Olsen, M.D.; Kim Bradley, Apache Mall; Cynthia Suhr; Jane and John Collins (Cynthia’s parents); and Carole Stiles, Medical Social Services.

During planning for Mayo's Sesquicentennial, a survey went out to staff asking for their thoughts on how Mayo could best celebrate 150 years of patient care. The responses, according to Kerry Olsen, M.D., had nothing to do [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Tags: 150th Patient Care Fund, Dr Kerry Olsen, Healthy Human Race, Mayo Clinic Hospital, Sesquicentennial

July 22nd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Adventures in Mayo Clinic Ventures

By In the Loop

idea760When you think about entrepreneurs and breakthrough inventions, you might imagine someone tinkering with a gadget (perhaps a doohickey or thingamajig) in a garage. You might not, however, picture a Mayo researcher tinkering with peptides to fight hypertension, creating a tracking system for viruses, or fashioning a tool to make medical information easier to read for those with poor vision. But our friends at Mayo Clinic Ventures would like us to, and a recent article series in the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal gets under the hood to explore why.

Mayo's efforts to encourage entrepreneurship and support startups is not only good for medicine, but as writer Katharine Grayson suggests, bringing new ideas to [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Tags: Dr Horng Chen, Dr John Burnett, Dr Randall Walker, hypertension, Infectious Diseases, Kah Whye Peng, Mayo Clinic Ventures, Oncology, technology

July 22nd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Quote of the day

By In the Loop

“Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.”

Albert Einstein

July 17th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

A Long Journey to Say 'Thank You'

By In the Loop

Bayasaa Bars with his fiance and Mayo Clinic's Kim Schmidt and Kathi Kaehler

Bayasaa Bars with his fiance, Enhule Chuluunbatar, and members of his host family, Kathi Kaehler (left) and Kim Schmidt (right).

In 2002, a young boy named Bayasaa Bars came to Mayo Clinic from Mongolia for life-saving heart surgery. It was a bit of a miracle for the 14-year-old, who was born with a hole in his heart. Until a surgery in Mongolia at age 8, he hadn't been able to take more than a dozen steps without needing to rest. Even after that surgery, his heart was at risk and he wasn't able to take part in many activities like other kids in his community. Just days after his surgery at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, however, he was up and walking again. And off and running.

In 2014, Bayasaa's return to Rochester also was worthy of a few superlatives. Last year, after a little online sleuthing, he reconnected with his host family -- Mayo Clinic staffers (and sisters) Kim Schmidt, Blood Bank, and Kathi Kaehler, Psychiatry and Psychology, and their parents -- to thank them for what they had done to make his visit to Rochester not only possible but life-changing. Bayasaa also wanted to thank Samaritan's Purse Children’s Heart Project and the church in Rochester, Bethel Lutheran, that sponsored him and two other Mongolian children who traveled with him. And his care team.

That gave the enterprising Schmidt an idea. She asked Bayasaa if he'd be willing to come back to Rochester for a reunion if she could find a way to make it happen. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Tags: Dr Joseph Dearani, Heart Surgery, Samaritan's Purse

July 17th, 2014 · 2 Comments

Sudoku + Sondheim = A Sharper You

By In the Loop

Elderly couple using computer. Be cool. Stay in school. It turns out that old saying may be relevant even to those of us who are well past school-age. According to a story in the Poughkeepsie Journal, Mayo Clinic radiologist Prashanthi Vemuri, Ph.D., and a team of researchers studied what a lifetime of learning could do to prevent the onset of dementia. The learning did not have to be formal. The researchers found that reading, playing music and even playing games can help protect us from dementia. (Excuse us while we fire up Candy Crush Saga.)

"In terms of preventing cognitive impairment, education and occupation are important ... but so is intellectually stimulating activity during mid- to late-life," Dr. Vemuri tells the Journal.

The research team tracked 2,000 men and women ages 70 to 89 from 2004 to 2009. Most participants (about 1,700) had no mental impairment when the study began, and the rest had only mild impairment. They were scored based on these factors: past educational achievements; how intellectually complex their jobs had been; how much they had intellectually engaged themselves; and whether they carried a specific type of the APOE gene (considered to be the most significant risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease). [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Tags: Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Dr Prashanthi Vemuri, Research

July 17th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Quote of the Day

By In the Loop

"I have a memory like an elephant. In fact, elephants often consult me. "

Noel Coward

July 15th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

A gut feeling about microbes and rheumatoid arthritis

By In the Loop

bacteria760Call it a gut reaction. That's essentially what the Chicago Tribune did when reporting on a possible link between "the trillions of microbes living and working" inside our digestive systems and rheumatoid arthritis, a "mysterious and painful autoimmune disorder that causes inflammation in the joints." While the paper reports that a smoking gun trigger has yet to show itself, some "emerging research" suggests that our "intestinal bacteria" has the potential to influence our odds of developing certain autoimmune diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis.

It's a finding, the paper says, that could lead to new "novel treatments and diagnostic methods" for the more than 1 million Americans living with rheumatoid arthritis. The latest link was discovered by a team of scientists at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, who compared "the gut bacteria" of patients with known cases of rheumatoid arthritis with those of healthy people. They found that that a bacterium "known as Prevotella copri" was "more abundant in patients with newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis than in healthy people or patients with chronic, treated rheumatoid arthritis." The lead researcher called the finding "the clearest association with a particular microbe to date."

Although some connections between intestinal bacteria and rheumatoid arthritis have been made, researchers, including Veena Taneja, Ph.D., associate professor of immunology at Mayo Clinic, tell the Tribune more research is needed to figure out whether bacteria is a "cause or a consequence" of the disease. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Tags: auo, bacteria, immunology, rheumatoid arthritis, Veena Taneja

July 15th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

A Survivor's Story

By In the Loop

Survivor760Black Friday took on new meaning for Jay Johnson of Owatonna, Minnesota, after what was supposed to be a routine colonoscopy in November 2012. "My wife, Wendy, went in with me, and I felt good," he tells the Owatonna People's Press of his visit to Mayo Clinic Health System in Owatonna. "We had no concerns at all." That changed, however, when his doctor came back into the room with the results. "He said, 'We have some concerns. We found a tumor,'" Jay tells the newspaper. "It didn't really hit me what he was talking about."

His doctor took a biopsy of the tumor and sent it to Mayo Clinic in Rochester for testing. The results came back the day after Thanksgiving. As the rest of the world was out shopping for the holidays (or studiously avoiding it), Jay Johnson got a call from his doctor who told him his tumor was cancerous. "It totally hits you like a ton of bricks," Jay says. "I remember asking him, 'Can I survive this?' He said, 'Yes, you can survive this.'"

He knew succumbing to his fears wasn't going to do him any good, so Jay jumped in head first, beginning a series of radiation treatments at Mayo Clinic. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Tags: cancer, colon cancer, colonoscopy, Mayo Clinic Health System, Owatonna

Load More