In The Loop

News and views from across Mayo Clinic

October 30th, 2014 · 1 Comment

The e-Patient Takes a Turn at ‘Professor’

By In the Loop

ePatient Dave chatting with doctor

Photo courtesy of epatientdave.com

Dave deBronkart once led a riveted TED talk audience in a chant of, “Let patients help!” On that same stage, he gave a brief performance of the “Give me my ____ data” rap (penned in his honor). At Mayo Clinic’s Transform symposium, he presented a talk called “I Love My Doctor.” Now the author, speaker and tireless advocate for patients everywhere will do something truly unexpected. Next spring, he’ll be a Visiting Professor at Mayo Clinic.

Each year, Mayo Clinic internal medicine chief residents invite a visiting professor to join them for several days of educational activities and to speak at Grand Rounds. Previous selections have included leaders in medical education (Dr. Jeffrey Wiese), and quality and safety (Dr. Robert Wachter), as well as the CDC’s epidemic intelligence service (Dr. Douglas Hamilton). “This year, we wanted our choice to represent a field with a similarly widespread impact on the future of medical practice,” the residents wrote in a post on the Social Media Health Network website. Their choice, they say, reflects the importance of a “union of forces” between providers and patients. [...]

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Tags: Dave deBronkart, Internal medicine, Transform

October 30th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Getting to the Core, or Corps, of the Story

By In the Loop

Randy and Crystal being interviewed by StoryCorpsTwenty-one. That's the number of times that Randy Setzer died and was brought back as Emergency Department staff at Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire worked to save him after he suddenly fainted one day at work. "The ER staff worked for roughly two hours doing CPR, and they said I would go on them, and they would do CPR, and I would come back for a couple minutes," he says. "And according to Mayo's records, I had passed on 21 times."

When Randy's wife, Crystal, got to the Emergency Room, doctors told her she had a decision to make.   "The pulmonary doctor came out and told me it doesn't look good," she says. Her husband had suffered a pulmonary embolism and had massive blood clots blocking both sides of his pulmonary artery. "He said, 'Mrs. Setzer you need to make a choice. We either stop CPR and just let him go or try' … I think it was called … an emergency pulmonary embolectomy. But he said, 'Mrs. Setzer I want you to be prepared that your husband probably won't survive it.'" [...]

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Tags: Dr Robert Wiechmann, emergency medicine, Sesquicentennial

October 30th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Quote of the day

By In the Loop

“I’ve been online enough to know that if I don’t like the first results I get, I look for more.”

ePatient Dave

October 28th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Rochester -- Land of the Lost Wheelchair

By In the Loop

 

You can find abandoned wheelchairs in some interesting places in Rochester. Rochester, Minnesota, is known for a few things you might not expect to see in a city of its size. In addition to "excellent health care," livability.com, which recently named Rochester the second best small to mid-sized city in America, highlights the city's "creative vibe" as well as its "stable economy, recreational assets, and a large collection of restaurants and unique shops." Rochester, it turns out, is also known for wheelchairs -- abandoned Mayo Clinic-owned-and-issued wheelchairs, which are scattered about the city. According to a story by Minnesota Public Radio (which has been picked up by others, including the St. Paul Pioneer Press and Washington Times), that's just part of life in Rochester.

"From city parking ramps and downtown sidewalks to park trails and the local mall, the chairs have an inescapable presence," MPR's Elizabeth Baier notes. When asked about seeing abandoned Mayo Clinic wheelchairs throughout the city, Rochester resident Denny Scanlan tells MPR, "Well, I see them kind of everywhere we go, I guess -- where you least expect them." To which his wife, Carol, adds: "We're so used to it that I don't even notice it."  [...]

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Tags: General Service, Patient Amenities, Wheelchairs

October 28th, 2014 · 1 Comment

Brand New Brand Madness – Minnesota-style

By In the Loop

MayoFlag760

The good folks at the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal are back with another Brand Madness competition. The event lets fans of “Minnesota’s iconic business and product names” show support for their favorite brands in a single-elimination tournament based on popular vote.

This year, Mayo Clinic and Red Wing Shoes have (ahem) stomped the competition and are now facing one another in the final round -- the last survivors of the original 64-brand field.

Cast your vote by 11:59 p.m. on Oct. 30.

You may recall that back in 2011, Mayo was edged out in the Brand Madness thanks to a "spirited" showing by fans of Creative Memories. (We’re trying to forget.) Although the scrap bookers took us to the matte back then, we’re predicting that things will unfold differently this time around.

[...]

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Tags: Brand

October 28th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Quote of the day

By In the Loop

"A brand is no longer what we tell the consumer it is – it is what consumers tell each other it is."

Scott Cook

October 23rd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

From Caregiver to Patient: Tracey's Survivor Story

By In the Loop

Tracey Samuelson

In 2012, Tracey Samuelson noticed that her left breast looked different than the right. She chalked it up to the rigors of childbirth and breastfeeding. Besides, she told herself, there wasn't a lump. Still, when she went for a routine physical exam at the beginning of 2013, the change in her breast was still in the back of her mind. So she mentioned it to her primary care provider, Joanna Setla, M.D., who suggested Tracey have a mammogram … just in case.

Expecting to go back home immediately afterward, Tracey, a triage nurse in Orthopedics at Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, was surprised when Dr. Setla asked her to stick around. Her surprise turned to concern when a second mammogram was ordered, followed by an ultrasound. Then Dr. Setla sat Tracey down and told her they needed to call a surgeon. David Ciresi, M.D., confirmed what Tracey feared: she had breast cancer.

"I sat there and listened and tried to remember all the important information I had learned about breast cancer so I could prepare myself better," she tells the Eau Claire Leader-Telegram. "Nothing prepared me for the moment when my doctor said I would lose my hair. I broke down and finally realized this was happening to me." [...]

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Tags: Breast Cancer, Dr David Ciresi, Dr Joanna Setla

October 23rd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

From Heart Surgery to the Volleyball Court — in Eight Days

By In the Loop

Volleyball players on court at net

On Friday, Oct. 10, Tess Thomas found herself on familiar ground: the volleyball court. It's a place the Gardiner (Montana) High School senior has logged a lot of hours. But in late September, it was a place she tells the Billings Gazette she thought she might never be again. Tess was diagnosed with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, a "fairly rare" condition that (according to mayoclinic.org) affects about four of every 100,000 people. Those with the syndrome have an extra electrical pathway between the upper and lower chambers of the heart, which causes a rapid heartbeat.

The first sign there was a problem came during a semifinal volleyball match, Tess tells the newspaper. "My heart was racing, my chest was feeling heavy, and I got light-headed," she says. The "episodes" continued during practice and the school day. "It became more intense," she says. And more consistent. That's when her mother, Wendy, scheduled an appointment with a doctor in Bozeman. After an EKG, Tess was "shocked" to receive the diagnosis. For many people, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is harmless. But for others, it can lead to fainting spells, a rapid heartbeat, and even sudden death. Because symptoms are often brought on by exercise, Tess tells the newspaper, "I didn't know if I would play again."  [...]

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Tags: Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

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